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(Winners announced!) Third Culture Kids Charter of Compassion

with 183 comments

(Trailer from Charter of Compassion. Share your ideas and win prizes! (Competition is over.) Winners of the best idea has been announced! Scroll below to see the finalists.)

We are honored to announce that TCKID.com has been invited as a partner of TED.com’s Charter of Compassion which has recently been featured on CNN!

What does it mean for you and Third Culture Kids?

  • Unique opportunity to have your creative ideas featured and reach massive media coverage.
  • Making a difference by showing stories of compassion and forgiveness from around the globe.
  • Prize: Ruth Van Reken will offer 3 autographed copies of the Third Culture Kid book to the winner(s) and finalists!

Why is this important?
We globalized technology, culture and trade, but we haven’t yet globalized compassion. Third Culture Kids have a role in globalizing compassion.
What is Compassion?
The issue is Compassion in all contexts: in schools, in our homes, family, political, ethical, religious and non-religious contexts.
Compassion doesn’t mean feeling sorry for people. It doesn’t mean pity. It means putting yourself in the position of the other, learning about the other. Learning what’s motivating the other, learning about their grievances. – Karen Armstrong.
But now it’s up to you.
We want to hear your most creative ideas for an event on Compassion and forgiveness from a Third Culture Kid perspective.

What to do next?

  • VOTE FOR THESE SUGGESTIONS: (Share your ideas).vote

[poll id=”3″]

Leave a comment to share your ideas! Your two to three sentences should be as detailed, creative and concrete as possible.
It’s crucial that we hear from all TCKs today.

Thank you,

Judging Committee:

Dr. Paulette Bethel, Ruth Van Reken, Kimberly Van Cleave Michaels of FIGT and Erin Sinogba.

WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

Dear Contestants – thank you for participating, for sharing your ideas with the community.

We are happy to announce to you that we have the 3 winners of the books donated by Ruth E. Van Reken’s, NEW REVISED EDITION: Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds, Revised Edition by David C. Pollack and Ruth E. Van Reken.


The judging committee has been busy the past month reading and selecting finalists, from among 84 excellent ideas we had to choose from to select the 4 books winners. Their submissions will be become part of the finalists ideas that were originally provided and voted upon.


THE WINNERS OF THE BOOKS AND FINALISTS ENTRIES OF THE TCKID CHARTER OF COMPASSION COMPETITION 2009 ARE:

1. Compassion in 100 Languages. A Video presentation of Global Nomads speak the Golden Rule: “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”

Winner: Takako

2. A Day in Your Shoes: Ask someone in your life, or a stranger if appropriate (or go to an agency or organization or nursing home or somewhere) if you can spend some time with them as they live with something difficult.

Winner: Kathryn Cole

3. A “Day of Awesomeness”. We spend most of our time looking at other people’s faults, criticizing them either because we disagree with them or because it helps them improve themselves or what they do, and that can be painful. Take a day to look at everyone you know and strangers you encounter, think about what makes them awesome and affirm them.

Winner: John Chuidian

4. “Idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion”. Select from all the contributions you get for this initiative the 365/366 most creative and diverse ideas, prepare with those a daily “E-idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion”

Winner: joining hands

We will release the overall competition winning idea in the very near future. Again, thank you everyone for your energy, creativity and sharing of ideas with the TCKID community and the TCKID Charter of Compassion Competition!

We are happy to announce to you that we have the 3 winners of the books donated by Ruth E. Van Reken’s, Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds, Revised Edition by David C. Pollack and Ruth E. Van Reken.
The judging committee has been busy the past month reading and selecting finalists, from among 84 excellent ideas we had to choose from to select the 4 books winners. Their submissions will be become part of the finalists ideas that were originally provided and voted upon.

Written by Myra Dumapias

November 11, 2009 at 1:54 pm

183 Responses

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  1. Yay for TCKID's support! I voted for the first choice but I thought the idea is vague. Creativity could mean so many things from painting to writing, forecasting, and partying ;-P

    I think the statement can be narrowed or broken into several points to make it clearer. I had to read it a couple of times to think about what I really want to do.

    Miyon

    November 11, 2009 at 2:58 pm

  2. Hey Brice, I have a few ideas…they are actually my daily goals for 2009. I think this is the perfect opportunity for me to share them with the world!

    1) Find one example of how [insert “home” country here] was good/nice/helpful to me today.
    (This is what helps me understand that brazilians don't all hate me, and helps me make (inner?) peace with my home country.)

    2) Find one thing that I can relate to [insert “home” country here] once a day.
    (my goal is actually a bit different than that, so I think this will be one of my 2010 goals)

    3) Find one thing to be thankful for when I wake up and one thing to be thankful for when I go to sleep.
    (this helps me find positive things in my life, even if I'm not feeling very happy at the moment)

    4) Say the following prayer once a day: dear God, please bring peace and spiritual elevation for every being in the universe.
    (I actually got the idea of this sentence from a book about Buddhism that my dad lent me)

    5) Also, whenever I drive by a not-so-good neighbourhood, I try to remember to say the following prayer: “dear God, please bring peace and prosperity to the people in this area”.

    I know it's not much, but I also know that prayers have power. And I guess it's all I feel capable of doing right now. So I hope that by sharing this with other people (even if just one of my goals) it helps them feel more inner peace too.

    Maira Bay

    November 11, 2009 at 3:02 pm

  3. I agree. Can anyone make a creative suggestion and improve this idea?

    “Love Your International Neighbor Month. Express your love creatively to someone regardless of their race, language, culture, religion, social status or physical ability.”

    How will you love your neighbor? What specific action can people take?

    tckid

    November 11, 2009 at 3:04 pm

  4. Hi Maira,
    I think the idea of thankfulness fits well with the criteria of compassion. Self-compassion is important too!

    “3) Find one thing to be thankful for when I wake up and one thing to be thankful for when I go to sleep.
    (this helps me find positive things in my life, even if I'm not feeling very happy at the moment)”

    tckid

    November 11, 2009 at 3:08 pm

  5. How about making tree? Each participant will write his/her idea of small act of expressing love to international neighbor on the leaf and attach it on branch of the tree.

    Takako

    November 11, 2009 at 3:17 pm

  6. Oh, good idea Takako. Voted for yours. Can anyone else add to this or share ideas?

    By the way, you can click on “Like” if you like someone's comment.

    tckid

    November 11, 2009 at 3:21 pm

  7. hey brice 🙂

    here are my ideas about helping my neighbour, i think that these are quite simple but if my neighbour would do this to me i would really appreciate it xD

    I would try to greet or at least smile at them when i see them. Whenever my neighbour mows the grass or shovels the snow for me, it makes my day and it will be a pleasure to do the same. Sometimes, my family and I would send some homemade bread or food to our neighbours. Hearing that they like the food that we sent even though its foreign to them makes us proud to share part of our culture.

    I know it's simple but hey, every thought counts right? 😉

    Karen

    November 11, 2009 at 3:24 pm

  8. Great suggestions, Karen! I wish someone would shovel the snow for me too. lol

    Can someone use Karen's idea and write it in two to three sentences to be as detailed, creative and concrete as possible that anyone can do?

    tckid

    November 11, 2009 at 3:33 pm

  9. My idea would be to have a communities open day where different communities perhaps either open up their churches mosques etc for the public to visit, or are encouraged to do a presentation in a community hall for the other local communities also do a presentation. The aim would be to show how each community is involved in compassion to themselves, others, animals etc. The idea is to break down barriers between communities and create connections.

    Paul

    November 11, 2009 at 4:19 pm

  10. Cultural Outreach Day
    – One day where members if TCKID, in whatever country they currently reside, do something to actively promote or exemplify Compassion/Understanding: host a cross-cultural food/dance day for the community; volunteer to work with refugees/migrants/asylum seekers; hold cross-cultural awareness seminars at a church/hall; challenge mono-cultural friends/relatives to truly experience an Other culture.

    Earley Days Yet

    November 11, 2009 at 5:00 pm

  11. I think for it to go viral it has to have an online element to it. Hopefully we can put all these elements together.

    How about a virtual TCK passport? Each page can have an image of the world that you can select countries from. Then every TCK/participant can write an entry for a country expressing why that place is special to them AND/OR people they knew there or touched their lives in some way. People can make as many entries as they want. So, gradually, the passport will grow in size with each entry taking up a page.

    Anyone want to develop this idea?

    Olivia

    November 11, 2009 at 5:01 pm

  12. The way I think is a little more global-with-no-barrier understanding. “Love Your International Neighbor Month” can simply become “Spread Your LOVE” campaign. I have noticed with 2.5 mile 6:30a walk, that by greeting a “Good Morning!” to a walker, runner or simply taking their dog for a walk, people respond back with a smile… sometimes people don't have interaction with other people and forget what “Good Morning!” does. A simple warm and kind greeting of “Good Morning” from a stranger might just make their day. Spreading compassion and goodwill is simple. We just reach out and touch someone.

    jeanniemarichkasahara

    November 11, 2009 at 5:01 pm

  13. I think for it to go viral it has to have an online element to it. Hopefully we can put all these elements together.

    How about a virtual TCK passport? Each page can have an image of the world that you can select countries from. Then every TCK/participant can write an entry for a country expressing why that place is special to them AND/OR people they knew there or touched their lives in some way. People can make as many entries as they want. So, gradually, the passport will grow in size with each entry taking up a page.

    Anyone want to develop this idea?

    Olivia

    November 11, 2009 at 5:04 pm

  14. Through small acts of neighbourly kindness & interaction, foster mutually social relationships with those you come into contact with. Mow a lawn, offer to babysit, take in your neighbour's bins, fix a bike, bake a cake, make toys/clothes for the kids across the street.

    Earley Days Yet

    November 11, 2009 at 5:06 pm

  15. Combine with point below?

    Earley Days Yet

    November 11, 2009 at 5:07 pm

  16. Actually, I don't even like the redefinition of borders. It could be a passport of individuals. A tribute to those who helped you at some point in your life and made a leap of cross-cultural faith……

    The aya who sang you to sleep, the family who put you up when you were stranded at a train station at midnight, the childhood friend you shared a bond with but maybe not even a language…..

    With the option to upload images etc, it could work.

    I think somehow we need to celebrate the universality of humanity with as few labels as possible.

    Olivia

    November 11, 2009 at 5:22 pm

  17. A passport with pages giving tribute to the people around the world who showed you compassion and helped to shape your global identity.

    Olivia

    November 11, 2009 at 5:48 pm

  18. Yay for this event! I voted for the first choice but I thought the idea is vague. Creativity could mean so many things from painting to writing, forecasting, and partying ;-PI think the statement can be narrowed or broken into several points to make it clearer. I had to read it a couple of times to understand what it meant and how I want to support TCKID.

    Miyon (Michelle) Kim

    November 11, 2009 at 10:58 pm

    • I agree. Can anyone make a creative suggestion and improve this idea?

      “Love Your International Neighbor Month. Express your love creatively to someone regardless of their race, language, culture, religion, social status or physical ability.”

      How will you love your neighbor? What specific action can people take?

      Anonymous

      November 11, 2009 at 11:04 pm

      • How about making tree? Each participant will write his/her idea of small act of expressing love to international neighbor on the leaf and attach it on branch of the tree.

        Takako

        November 11, 2009 at 11:17 pm

        • Oh, good idea Takako. Voted for yours. Can anyone else add to this or share ideas?

          By the way, you can click on “Like” if you like someone’s comment.

          Anonymous

          November 11, 2009 at 11:21 pm

          • I just got this idea. In my previous comment, I have suggested making tree, and each participant will write his/her idea of small act of love on the leaf. How about bringing it even further? The color of leaf is different. The each different color represents different religious, racial, national, social groups.

            Takako

            November 12, 2009 at 2:16 am

      • The way I think is a little more global-with-no-barrier understanding. “Love Your International Neighbor Month” can simply become “Spread Your LOVE” campaign. I have noticed with 2.5 mile 6:30a walk, that by greeting a “Good Morning!” to a walker, runner or simply taking their dog for a walk, people respond back with a smile… sometimes people don’t have interaction with other people and forget what “Good Morning!” does. A simple warm and kind greeting of “Good Morning” from a stranger might just make their day. Spreading compassion and goodwill is simple. We just reach out and touch someone.

        Anonymous

        November 12, 2009 at 1:01 am

      • I like the the our internatioanl neighbour month. Let’s make November the month of compassion, and the 12 th of November WE hug day – give your neighbour free hugs before they go work in the morning ( bus stop, street car, grocery store) and ask them give a hug to his neighbour. It will have a powerful domino effect and creates compassion and stronger sense of community. W can do a video of Tck’s giving free hugs in cities around the world. Afterall.,TCKs mother tongue is compassion!

        Anonymous

        November 12, 2009 at 4:43 am

        • Possibly too culture-specific? I live in Australia, and I can assure you that approaching people on their way to work and trying to hug them… well, I’d be more likely to cheer them up by just asking them to punch me in the nose!

          Earley Days Yet

          November 13, 2009 at 10:42 pm

  19. I have a few ideas…they are actually my daily goals for 2009. I think this is the perfect opportunity for me to share them with the world!1) Find one example of how [insert “home” country here] was good/nice/helpful to me today.(This is what helps me understand that brazilians don’t all hate me, and helps me make (inner?) peace with my home country.)2) Find one thing that I can relate to [insert “home” country here] once a day.(my goal is actually a bit different than that, so I think this will be one of my 2010 goals)3) Find one thing to be thankful for when I wake up and one thing to be thankful for when I go to sleep.(this helps me find positive things in my life, even if I’m not feeling very happy at the moment)4) Say the following prayer once a day: dear God, please bring peace and spiritual elevation for every being in the universe.(I actually got the idea of this sentence from a book about Buddhism that my dad lent me)5) Also, whenever I drive by a not-so-good neighbourhood, I try to remember to say the following prayer: “dear God, please bring peace and prosperity to the people in this area”.I know it’s not much, but I also know that prayers have power. And I guess it’s all I feel capable of doing right now. So I hope that by sharing this with other people (even if just one of my goals) it helps them feel more inner peace too.

    Maira Bay

    November 11, 2009 at 11:02 pm

    • Hi Maira,
      I think the idea of thankfulness fits well with the criteria of compassion. Self-compassion is important too!

      “3) Find one thing to be thankful for when I wake up and one thing to be thankful for when I go to sleep.
      (this helps me find positive things in my life, even if I’m not feeling very happy at the moment)”

      Anonymous

      November 11, 2009 at 11:08 pm

  20. I just got this idea. In my previous comment, I have suggested making tree, and each participant will write his/her idea of small act of love on the leaf. How about bringing it even further? The color of leaf is different. The each different color represents different religious, racial, national, social groups.

    Takako

    November 11, 2009 at 6:16 pm

  21. here are my ideas about helping my neighbour, i think that these are quite simple but if my neighbour would do this to me i would really appreciate it xDI would try to greet or at least smile at them when i see them. Whenever my neighbour mows the grass or shovels the snow for me, it makes my day and it will be a pleasure to do the same. Sometimes, my family and I would send some homemade bread or food to our neighbours. Hearing that they like the food that we sent even though its foreign to them makes us proud to share part of our culture.I know it’s simple but hey, every thought counts right? 😉

    Karen

    November 11, 2009 at 11:24 pm

    • Great suggestions, Karen! I wish someone would shovel the snow for me too. lol

      Can someone use Karen’s idea and write it in two to three sentences to be as detailed, creative and concrete as possible that anyone can do?

      Anonymous

      November 11, 2009 at 11:33 pm

      • Through small acts of neighbourly kindness & interaction, foster mutually social relationships with those you come into contact with. Mow a lawn, offer to babysit, take in your neighbour’s bins, fix a bike, bake a cake, make toys/clothes for the kids across the street.

        Earley Days Yet

        November 12, 2009 at 1:06 am

  22. My idea would be to have a communities open day where different communities perhaps either open up their churches mosques etc for the public to visit, or are encouraged to do a presentation in a community hall for the other local communities also do a presentation. The aim would be to show how each community is involved in compassion to themselves, others, animals etc. The idea is to break down barriers between communities and create connections.

    Paul

    November 12, 2009 at 12:19 am

  23. Cultural Outreach Day
    – One day where members if TCKID, in whatever country they currently reside, do something to actively promote or exemplify Compassion/Understanding: host a cross-cultural food/dance day for the community; volunteer to work with refugees/migrants/asylum seekers; hold cross-cultural awareness seminars at a church/hall; challenge mono-cultural friends/relatives to truly experience an Other culture.

    Earley Days Yet

    November 12, 2009 at 1:00 am

    • Combine with point below?

      Earley Days Yet

      November 12, 2009 at 1:07 am

  24. I think for it to go viral it has to have an online element to it. Hopefully we can put all these elements together.

    How about a virtual TCK passport? Each page can have an image of the world that you can select countries from. Then every TCK/participant can write an entry for a country expressing why that place is special to them AND/OR people they knew there or touched their lives in some way. People can make as many entries as they want. So, gradually, the passport will grow in size with each entry taking up a page.

    Anyone want to develop this idea?

    Olivia

    November 12, 2009 at 1:01 am

  25. I think for it to go viral it has to have an online element to it. Hopefully we can put all these elements together.

    How about a virtual TCK passport? Each page can have an image of the world that you can select countries from. Then every TCK/participant can write an entry for a country expressing why that place is special to them AND/OR people they knew there or touched their lives in some way. People can make as many entries as they want. So, gradually, the passport will grow in size with each entry taking up a page.

    Anyone want to develop this idea?

    Olivia

    November 12, 2009 at 1:04 am

  26. Actually, I don’t even like the redefinition of borders. It could be a passport of individuals. A tribute to those who helped you at some point in your life and made a leap of cross-cultural faith……

    The aya who sang you to sleep, the family who put you up when you were stranded at a train station at midnight, the childhood friend you shared a bond with but maybe not even a language…..

    With the option to upload images etc, it could work.

    I think somehow we need to celebrate the universality of humanity with as few labels as possible.

    Olivia

    November 12, 2009 at 1:22 am

  27. Compassion in 100 Languages. A Video presentation of Global Nomads speak the Golden Rule: “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”

    Takako

    November 11, 2009 at 8:25 pm

  28. Love it! 😉

    Anyone want to add to this? Or would like to be in the video?

    briceroyer

    November 11, 2009 at 8:30 pm

  29. “You're awesome”.

    Think about that. Many people are criticized a lot and even if criticism helps us see what we could be doing better, why not take time to go up to people you know and tell them why you think they're awesome?

    People criticize my writing, my lifestyle, my fashion sense, and my interests, and I do the same to others. Truth is, we may not always agree or like the same thing, but that doesn't mean we have to keep telling people that. It isn't good for self-esteem even if we have the maturity to understand that we disagree with others and we need to better ourselves from this criticism.

    But personally, I think it's always nice to hear someone compliment me. Even if someone says “you know what? that's pretty awesome you love to write. that's pretty awesome you make t-shirts. you're fun to be around and interesting. you're awesome!”

    Think about that and take a deep breath.

    You're awesome. For reading this. You can agree or disagree, but I think you're awesome for reading this and thinking about it.

    My suggestion: a day where we go up to people we know and instead of criticizing, think about what we like and what we want more of. None of the negative. Even if it's someone making fun of you, think about what about him is awesome. Then go up to him and say “you know what? You're awesome! I like the fact you can speak your mind and have fun with your friends. You're awesome!” while smiling and saying it sincerely.

    John Chuidian

    November 11, 2009 at 8:33 pm

  30. That's an awesome idea 🙂

    briceroyer

    November 11, 2009 at 8:39 pm

  31. I like the the our internatioanl neighbour month. Let's make November the month of compassion, and the 12 th of November WE hug day – give your neighbour free hugs before they go work in the morning ( bus stop, street car, grocery store) and ask them give a hug to his neighbour. It will have a powerful domino effect and creates compassion and stronger sense of community. W can do a video of Tck's giving free hugs in cities around the world. Afterall.,TCKs mother tongue is compassion!

    allegria

    November 11, 2009 at 8:43 pm

  32. CONCISE VERSION

    A “Day of Awesomeness” for everyone: we spend most of our time looking at other people's faults, criticizing them either because we disagree with them or because it helps them improve themselves or what they do, and that can be painful. Take a day to look at everyone you know and encounter, think about what makes them awesome, go up to them, and tell them “you're awesome”. Wouldn't you feel great if someone told you that you're awesome and why he or she thinks you're awesome?

    John Chuidian

    November 11, 2009 at 8:43 pm

  33. Everyone should do a video in language they know and send it to you.Example: I can do Polish, Persian and German.

    allegria

    November 11, 2009 at 8:45 pm

  34. A passport with pages giving tribute to the people around the world who showed you compassion and helped to shape your global identity.

    Olivia

    November 12, 2009 at 1:48 am

  35. Also, post twitter updates, go onto people's facebook profiles and say you think they're awesome and why, put together a video on youtube with some friend spreading the love and awesomeness.

    John Chuidian

    November 11, 2009 at 8:52 pm

  36. CONCISE VERSION (2.0)

    A “Day of Awesomeness” for everyone: we spend most of our time looking at other people's faults, criticizing them either because we disagree with them or because it helps them improve themselves or what they do, and that can be painful. Take a day to look at everyone you know and strangers you encounter, think about what makes them awesome, go up to them, and tell them “you're awesome” post it on their facebook profiles, your twitter status updates, and make youtube videos saying what you see in others as awesome. Wouldn't you feel great if someone told you that you're awesome and why he or she thinks you're awesome?

    John Chuidian

    November 11, 2009 at 8:57 pm

  37. My vote goes for the TCKID's Love Your International Neighbor Month 🙂

    Brice and all staffs of TCKids, thanks for keeping up the great works. In some day more people will understand what TCKids are! (and I can't wait until the forum is back…)

    facebook-5605434

    November 11, 2009 at 9:39 pm

  38. I like the Compassion in many languages idea. Maybe the video could be made to show a TCK AND a local person, so there would be a communication dimension, we would see the interaction happening, rather than just a sentence told looking at the camera ? One could begin in the language of the host country, and the local would finish (either in the host country language, or in the language of the TCK) ?? Brainstorming as I go, here 🙂 We can contribute from India, with multiracial TCK (France, US, Haiti and Spain,) and I'm sure we can find a local child, too…

    Katia

    November 11, 2009 at 10:13 pm

  39. Compassion in 100 Languages. A Video presentation of Global Nomads speak the Golden Rule: “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”

    Takako

    November 12, 2009 at 4:25 am

    • Love it! ;)Anyone else like this idea? Click on the button “Like” to vote for it below Takako’s comment.

      Anyone want to add to this? Or would like to be in the video?

      Anonymous

      November 12, 2009 at 4:30 am

      • Everyone should do a video in language they know and send it to you.Example: I can do Polish, Persian and German.

        Anonymous

        November 12, 2009 at 4:45 am

  40. “You’re awesome”.

    Think about that. Many people are criticized a lot and even if criticism helps us see what we could be doing better, why not take time to go up to people you know and tell them why you think they’re awesome?

    People criticize my writing, my lifestyle, my fashion sense, and my interests, and I do the same to others. Truth is, we may not always agree or like the same thing, but that doesn’t mean we have to keep telling people that. It isn’t good for self-esteem even if we have the maturity to understand that we disagree with others and we need to better ourselves from this criticism.

    But personally, I think it’s always nice to hear someone compliment me. Even if someone says “you know what? that’s pretty awesome you love to write. that’s pretty awesome you make t-shirts. you’re fun to be around and interesting. you’re awesome!”

    Think about that and take a deep breath.

    You’re awesome. For reading this. You can agree or disagree, but I think you’re awesome for reading this and thinking about it.

    My suggestion: a day where we go up to people we know and instead of criticizing, think about what we like and what we want more of. None of the negative. Even if it’s someone making fun of you, think about what about him is awesome. Then go up to him and say “you know what? You’re awesome! I like the fact you can speak your mind and have fun with your friends. You’re awesome!” while smiling and saying it sincerely.

    John Chuidian

    November 12, 2009 at 4:33 am

    • That’s an awesome idea 🙂

      Anonymous

      November 12, 2009 at 4:39 am

    • CONCISE VERSION

      A “Day of Awesomeness” for everyone: we spend most of our time looking at other people’s faults, criticizing them either because we disagree with them or because it helps them improve themselves or what they do, and that can be painful. Take a day to look at everyone you know and encounter, think about what makes them awesome, go up to them, and tell them “you’re awesome”. Wouldn’t you feel great if someone told you that you’re awesome and why he or she thinks you’re awesome?

      John Chuidian

      November 12, 2009 at 4:43 am

    • Also, post twitter updates, go onto people’s facebook profiles and say you think they’re awesome and why, put together a video on youtube with some friend spreading the love and awesomeness.

      John Chuidian

      November 12, 2009 at 4:52 am

      • CONCISE VERSION (2.0)

        A “Day of Awesomeness” for everyone: we spend most of our time looking at other people’s faults, criticizing them either because we disagree with them or because it helps them improve themselves or what they do, and that can be painful. Take a day to look at everyone you know and strangers you encounter, think about what makes them awesome, go up to them, and tell them “you’re awesome” post it on their facebook profiles, your twitter status updates, and make youtube videos saying what you see in others as awesome. Wouldn’t you feel great if someone told you that you’re awesome and why he or she thinks you’re awesome?

        John Chuidian

        November 12, 2009 at 4:57 am

  41. My vote goes for the TCKID’s Love Your International Neighbor Month :)Brice and all staffs of TCKids, thanks for keeping up the great works. In some day more people will understand what TCKids are! (and I can’t wait until the forum is back…)

    Anonymous

    November 12, 2009 at 5:39 am

  42. I like the Compassion in many languages idea. Maybe the video could be made to show a TCK AND a local person, so there would be a communication dimension, we would see the interaction happening, rather than just a sentence told looking at the camera ? One could begin in the language of the host country, and the local would finish (either in the host country language, or in the language of the TCK) ?? Brainstorming as I go, here 🙂 We can contribute from India, with multiracial TCK (France, US, Haiti and Spain,) and I’m sure we can find a local child, too…

    Katia

    November 12, 2009 at 6:13 am

  43. I agree with the idea of dedicating a special day for TCkids to remind us that there are TCkids in this world! It is always good to be reminded. I don't agree though with the mixing of issues. I personally don't like to see religion mentioned in the same context with TCKids. I understand that this is important to many of us – but not to all of the TCkids, I presume! I personally think that it is more global to refer to ethics and to leave each person have his or her own philosophy.
    Don't get me wrong, I do appreciate that religions come together and respect eachother! That should be clear! But why in the context of TCKid life?

    Wanda Koppensteiner

    November 12, 2009 at 1:24 am

  44. I agree with the idea of dedicating a special day for TCkids to remind us that there are TCkids in this world! It is always good to be reminded. I don't agree though with the mixing of issues. I personally don't like to see religion mentioned in the same context with TCKids. I understand that this is important to many of us – but not to all of the TCkids, I presume! I personally think that it is more global to refer to ethics and to leave each person have his or her own philosophy.
    Don't get me wrong, I do appreciate that religions come together and respect eachother! That should be clear! But why in the context of TCKid life?

    Wanda Koppensteiner

    November 12, 2009 at 1:26 am

  45. Light a candle for someone. Light crosses all barriers of language and culture giving hope and comfort . sometimes this is the only thing we can do for someone in need, but it makes such a difference!

    milena hellmold

    November 12, 2009 at 2:35 am

  46. Light a candle for someone. Light crosses all barriers of language and culture giving hope and comfort . sometimes this is the only thing we can do for someone in need, but it makes such a difference!

    milena hellmold

    November 12, 2009 at 2:36 am

  47. THIRD CULTURE KIDS
    O O N
    G M O
    E P W
    T A L
    H S E
    E S D
    R I G
    N O E
    E N
    S
    S

    TOGETHERNESS COMPASSION KNOWLEDGE
    H U I
    I L D
    R T S
    D U
    R
    E

    Joanna Kwiatowska

    November 12, 2009 at 3:42 am

  48. I agree with the idea of dedicating a special day for TCkids to remind us that there are TCkids in this world! It is always good to be reminded. I don’t agree though with the mixing of issues. I personally don’t like to see religion mentioned in the same context with TCKids. I understand that this is important to many of us – but not to all of the TCkids, I presume! I personally think that it is more global to refer to ethics and to leave each person have his or her own philosophy.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do appreciate that religions come together and respect eachother! That should be clear! But why in the context of TCKid life?

    Wanda Koppensteiner

    November 12, 2009 at 9:24 am

  49. I agree with the idea of dedicating a special day for TCkids to remind us that there are TCkids in this world! It is always good to be reminded. I don’t agree though with the mixing of issues. I personally don’t like to see religion mentioned in the same context with TCKids. I understand that this is important to many of us – but not to all of the TCkids, I presume! I personally think that it is more global to refer to ethics and to leave each person have his or her own philosophy.
    Don’t get me wrong, I do appreciate that religions come together and respect eachother! That should be clear! But why in the context of TCKid life?

    Wanda Koppensteiner

    November 12, 2009 at 9:26 am

    • Hi Wanda,The issue is about Compassion in all it’s context, areas and fields – in schools, on the street, at home, (which also includes religion, ethical systems, political systems, etc.) So it’s not about religion. Click link to learn more! <a href="http://charterforcompassion.org/about&quot; rel=”nofollow”>http://charterforcompassion.org/aboutGreat question! I’m glad I could clarify this in case others are wondering the same.Compassion in the context of TCKs: How can TCKs be more compassionate? Do you have ideas?

      Anonymous

      November 12, 2009 at 1:08 pm

      • Oops! thanks for that clarification! My mistake! I missed all that info!
        thanks again!

        Wanda

        November 13, 2009 at 8:36 am

  50. Hi Wanda,

    The issue is about Compassion in all it's areas and fields (which also includes religion, ethical systems, political systems, etc.) So it's not about religion.

    Click link to learn more!
    http://charterforcompassion.org/about

    Compassion in the context of TCKs: How can TCKs be more compassionate? Do you have ideas?

    tckid

    November 12, 2009 at 5:08 am

  51. Light a candle for someone. Light crosses all barriers of language and culture giving hope and comfort . sometimes this is the only thing we can do for someone in need, but it makes such a difference!

    milena hellmold

    November 12, 2009 at 10:35 am

    • milena, wie geht es dir, wie kann ich dich oder renate finden? herzlich bettina, damals in tanzania mit aco, linus und ruben

      bettina

      September 15, 2010 at 1:30 pm

  52. Light a candle for someone. Light crosses all barriers of language and culture giving hope and comfort . sometimes this is the only thing we can do for someone in need, but it makes such a difference!

    milena hellmold

    November 12, 2009 at 10:36 am

  53. The day before the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur is a day of asking forgiveness from people. As Yom Kippur is a day of attonement, asking God's forgiveness, receiving God's forgiveness. I think that a day of asking forgiveness is a great idea. What better way to begin to champion a cause than to start with a clean slate ourselves.

    verasteury

    November 12, 2009 at 5:48 am

  54. Cosmopolitain travel. Prove that we are cosmopolitain by travelling to a country you've never been, but don't stay in a hotel! Instead stay with a TCK that lives in your country of choice!

    josephpollack

    November 12, 2009 at 6:26 am

  55. Non-verbal communication through the arts (visual & performing). Building compassion through community art (visual & performing) workshops that stress the importance of collaboration between cultures, generations, race, and religions. The result, a community based showcase & presentation. By putting this deadline, people are more inclined to put their differences aside and work together by showing compassion towards a common goal.

    This can be done in schools, community centers, religious centers, seminars, conferences, cities, villages, etc.

    Alaine

    November 12, 2009 at 6:39 am

  56. THIRD CULTURE KIDS
    O        O        N

    G     M       O
    E     P       W
    T     A       L

    H     S       E
    E     S       D
    R     I       G

    N     O       E
    E     N      
    S    

    S

    TOGETHERNESS COMPASSION KNOWLEDGE
    H            U          I
    I            L          D

    R            T          S
    D            U
                 R
                 E

    Joanna Kwiatowska

    November 12, 2009 at 11:42 am

  57. Great idea Alaine. Visual arts is a great medium we could use for this.

    Could anyone use this idea and write a two to three sentences should be as detailed, creative and concrete as possible?

    Here's an example that Takako posted with 7 votes so far:

    Compassion in 100 Languages. A Video presentation of Global Nomads speak the Golden Rule: “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”

    tckid

    November 12, 2009 at 6:44 am

  58. Award honorary “family” degrees to the many people from the many cultures you lived in who became family to you (and let them know!!) (I have always wanted to hold my “funeral” BEFORE I die–much is said at funerals that the person should hear while they are still living. . .)

    rachelkraybillstahl

    November 12, 2009 at 6:52 am

  59. Years ago there was a poster campaign by Teaching Tolerance.org.. they had enlisted the aid of artists to develop very powerful posters and then made them available to schools free of charge to place on doors, bulletin boards, entry ways.. this might be a great way to raise awareness of compassion.

    patriciareynolds

    November 12, 2009 at 7:30 am

  60. Postcards/Snapshots of Compassion. Kids draw or photograph an act of compassion. Display in a local municipal building or mail to someone in need of compassion in a postcard format.

    Karen Richardson

    November 12, 2009 at 8:10 am

  61. Compassion Chain. Write a sentence to help others understand you and your world. Send it to a friend. Let them listen to your words. Let them add something else to the letter or email and send it on. Let the world listen and understand compassionately.

    Melo-day

    November 12, 2009 at 8:10 am

  62. Give cameras to children all over the world and ask them to take photos of acts of compassion. Collect them, develop the pictures. Then put these together for a commercial to be aired on CNN or another major network that is seen all over the world.

    Kim Gundle

    November 12, 2009 at 8:35 am

  63. Sorry Karen,I did not see your post before I put my idea up.

    Kim G

    November 12, 2009 at 8:42 am

  64. The day before the Jewish holiday Yom Kippur is a day of asking forgiveness from people. As Yom Kippur is a day of attonement, asking God’s forgiveness, receiving God’s forgiveness. I think that a day of asking forgiveness is a great idea. What better way to begin to champion a cause than to start with a clean slate ourselves.

    Anonymous

    November 12, 2009 at 1:48 pm

  65. I like the idea of the Love Your International Neighbor month, but the 3CK is more specific than an international neighbor and the other proposed ideas are also not specific to 3CKs. Are these to be done for or by 3CKs or both? Could we formulate a month that teaches about 3CKs and related mixed culture forms of growing up, perhaps with daily interviews with kids going through the issues, problems and gifts,directed to different educational levels and of a length that could make them online accessible for classroom use and tapes of them for later use? It would need a carefully worked out scaffolding.

    Richard Freis

    November 12, 2009 at 8:58 am

  66. Cosmopolitain travel. Prove that we are cosmopolitain by travelling to a country you’ve never been, but don’t stay in a hotel! Instead stay with a TCK that lives in your country of choice!

    Anonymous

    November 12, 2009 at 2:26 pm

  67. Non-verbal communication through the arts (visual & performing). Building compassion through community art (visual & performing) workshops that stress the importance of collaboration between cultures, generations, race, and religions. The result, a community based showcase & presentation. By putting this deadline, people are more inclined to put their differences aside and work together by showing compassion towards a common goal.

    This can be done in schools, community centers, religious centers, seminars, conferences, cities, villages, etc.

    Alaine

    November 12, 2009 at 2:39 pm

    • Great idea Alaine. Visual arts is a great medium we could use for this.

      Could anyone use this idea and write a two to three sentences should be as detailed, creative and concrete as possible?

      Here’s an example that Takako posted with 7 votes so far:

      Compassion in 100 Languages. A Video presentation of Global Nomads speak the Golden Rule: “Do to others what you would have them do to you.”

      Anonymous

      November 12, 2009 at 2:44 pm

      • I think a photo slideshow, film, visual art display of showing compassion to others from different racial, cultural, ethnic, religious, and displaying it in a traveling gallery would be a great way. At the gallery openings, dance, music, theater performances showing compassion to others of different backgrounds could also take place from the local community of that city/town/village.

        Alaine

        November 14, 2009 at 5:02 am

  68. Award honorary “family” degrees to the many people from the many cultures you lived in who became family to you (and let them know!!) (I have always wanted to hold my “funeral” BEFORE I die–much is said at funerals that the person should hear while they are still living. . .)

    Anonymous

    November 12, 2009 at 2:52 pm

  69. My idea is a giant “Thank You, Nanny” card. Here's how it works: A group of TCKs will make a video of themselves at a busy part of town in their host country, each writing a short thank-you note on a giant poster board laid out on the sidewalk, titled “Thank you, (insert the word “nanny” in host language)!” Everyone will then send in their video to be posted on a website. The website will then contain a compilation of videos sent in from all over the world!

    Alan Kemsley

    November 12, 2009 at 10:29 am

  70. Years ago there was a poster campaign by Teaching Tolerance.org.. they had enlisted the aid of artists to develop very powerful posters and then made them available to schools free of charge to place on doors, bulletin boards, entry ways.. this might be a great way to raise awareness of compassion.

    Anonymous

    November 12, 2009 at 3:30 pm

  71. Postcards/Snapshots of Compassion. Kids draw or photograph an act of compassion. Display in a local municipal building or mail to someone in need of compassion in a postcard format.

    Karen Richardson

    November 12, 2009 at 4:10 pm

    • Sorry Karen,I did not see your post before I put my idea up.

      Kim G

      November 12, 2009 at 4:42 pm

  72. Compassion Chain. Write a sentence to help others understand you and your world. Send it to a friend. Let them listen to your words. Let them add something else to the letter or email and send it on. Let the world listen and understand compassionately.

    Melo-day

    November 12, 2009 at 4:10 pm

  73. Give cameras to children all over the world and ask them to take photos of acts of compassion. Collect them, develop the pictures. Then put these together for a commercial to be aired on CNN or another major network that is seen all over the world.

    Kim Gundle

    November 12, 2009 at 4:35 pm

  74. I like the idea of the Love Your International Neighbor month, but the 3CK is more specific than an international neighbor and the other proposed ideas are also not specific to 3CKs. Are these to be done for or by 3CKs or both? Could we formulate a month that teaches about 3CKs and related mixed culture forms of growing up, perhaps with daily interviews with kids going through the issues, problems and gifts,directed to different educational levels and of a length that could make them online accessible for classroom use and tapes of them for later use? It would need a carefully worked out scaffolding.

    Richard Freis

    November 12, 2009 at 4:58 pm

  75. How about making a video showing TCKs that have made a major impact in promoting compassion and respect through their political efforts, music, art, books, films, ect… There are so many out there!

    Suellen Bonga

    November 12, 2009 at 1:09 pm

  76. My idea is a giant “Thank You, Nanny” card. Here’s how it works: A group of TCKs will make a video of themselves at a busy part of town in their host country, each writing a short thank-you note on a giant poster board laid out on the sidewalk, titled “Thank you, (insert the word “nanny” in host language)!” Everyone will then send in their video to be posted on a website. The website will then contain a compilation of videos sent in from all over the world!

    Alan Kemsley

    November 12, 2009 at 6:29 pm

    • This does assume that people HAD a nanny, something that it isn’t a given across the TCK community. Perhaps it would be more effective to make some sort of country-specific outreach?

      Earley Days Yet

      November 13, 2009 at 10:35 pm

  77. Third  Culture Kids
    o        o           n
    g        m          o
    e        p           w
    t         a           l
    h        s           e
    e        s           d
    r         i            g
    n        o           e
    e        n

    Joanna Kwiatowska

    November 12, 2009 at 2:11 pm

  78. How about making a video showing TCKs that have made a major impact in promoting compassion and respect through their political efforts, music, art, books, films, ect… There are so many out there!

    Suellen Bonga

    November 12, 2009 at 9:09 pm

  79. Third  Culture Kidso        o           ng        m          o
    e        p           w
    t         a           l
    h        s           e
    e        s           d
    r         i            g
    n        o           e
    e        n
    s
    s

    Togetherness  Compassion  Knowledge
    h                     u                    i
    i                       l                    d
    r                      t                     s
    d                     u
                           r
                           e

    Joanna Kwiatowska

    November 12, 2009 at 10:11 pm

  80. Oops! thanks for that clarification! My mistake! I missed all that info!
    thanks again!

    Wanda

    November 13, 2009 at 12:36 am

  81. Hi Richard,

    I am so glad to see you here. Keep those ideas coming.

    Paulette Bethel

    November 13, 2009 at 9:04 am

  82. Thank you everyone for your awesome inputs. Keep them coming, so that TCKID.com will be selected By TED as one of the groups to receive media attention for our efforts.

    Paulette Bethel

    November 13, 2009 at 9:07 am

  83. How about creating a video or a calendar giving ideas on how we can show compassion every day of the month? We can call it 30 ways to show compassion: such as call a friend, write a note, volunteer, tell someone you appreciate them, give someone a hug, forgive etc….

    emyloulewis

    November 13, 2009 at 10:35 am

  84. The votes are coming in. Let your friends know. Post to your Facebook and Twitter account. Keep those ideas and suggestions coming.

    Paulette Bethel

    November 13, 2009 at 11:35 am

  85. Thank you everyone for your awesome inputs. Keep them coming, so that TCKID.com will be selected By TED as one of the groups to receive media attention for our efforts.

    Paulette Bethel

    November 13, 2009 at 5:07 pm

  86. For people who are citizens of or were born in or otherwise live in the United States of America (USA), how about starting a movement to stop folks from referring to themselves or having others refer to them as “Americans”. There are many countries in North, Central, and South America. As a citizen of the USA I lived and visited many other American countries as a child and continue to do so today. I learned an important lesson in global affairs as a teen of 13 in Ecuador, in the 1960's, when a new Ecuadorian friend first asked me where I was from. I replied “America”. He said he knew I was American, but wanted to know where I was from. I said I had just indicated I was from “America”. He indicated he knew that, but wanted to know what part of America I was from – Canada or the United States of America. I said there is only one America, and it was the USA. He laughed and said that was incorrect, as America is a huge place with many countries in it, and that he was also an American, albeit from South America and Ecuador as one of the countries in that part of the South American continent. He also quite gently informed that many other South Americans were bit resentful of folks from the USA referring only to themselves as “real” or “original” Americans as South Americans are as American as any other American. I was flabbergasted. And realized he was absolutely correct. And learned a great lesson.

    steveresler

    November 13, 2009 at 12:19 pm

  87. How about creating a video or a calendar giving ideas on how we can show compassion every day of the month? We can call it 30 ways to show compassion: such as call a friend, write a note, volunteer, tell someone you appreciate them, give someone a hug, forgive etc….

    Anonymous

    November 13, 2009 at 6:35 pm

  88. We should pick a different culture than our own and give yourself an assignment to interview, participate in an event and do first hand research in order to better understand a neighbor, here and abroad. Learn “hello” “goodbye” and “thank you” in that language and use at every opportunity to begin to recognize, start a conversation and see what response you get. It will change the way you are with “foreigners” and hopefully encourage curiousity of others unlike yourself.

    karmaworker

    November 13, 2009 at 2:21 pm

  89. The votes are coming in. Let your friends know. Post to your Facebook and Twitter account. Keep those ideas and suggestions coming.

    Paulette Bethel

    November 13, 2009 at 7:35 pm

  90. This does assume that people HAD a nanny, something that it isn't a given across the TCK community. Perhaps it would be more effective to make some sort of country-specific outreach?

    Earley Days Yet

    November 13, 2009 at 2:35 pm

  91. I'd like to add for the viral element: a video that contains the learned phrases in the new language with some representation of the 1st culture and the second or third. I learned those greetings/responses in Tibetan while I was in India for 6 months. I use them often here, back home in California and I always get a positive reaction and usually a conversation. Needless to say they are surprised that a black American knows a little about their culture and language.

    karmaworker

    November 13, 2009 at 2:38 pm

  92. Possibly too culture-specific? I live in Australia, and I can assure you that approaching people on their way to work and trying to hug them… well, I'd be more likely to cheer them up by just asking them to punch me in the nose!

    Earley Days Yet

    November 13, 2009 at 2:42 pm

  93. For people who are citizens of or were born in or otherwise live in the United States of America (USA), how about starting a movement to stop folks from referring to themselves or having others refer to them as “Americans”. There are many countries in North, Central, and South America. As a citizen of the USA I lived and visited many other American countries as a child and continue to do so today. I learned an important lesson in global affairs as a teen of 13 in Ecuador, in the 1960’s, when a new Ecuadorian friend first asked me where I was from. I replied “America”. He said he knew I was American, but wanted to know where I was from. I said I had just indicated I was from “America”. He indicated he knew that, but wanted to know what part of America I was from – Canada or the United States of America. I said there is only one America, and it was the USA. He laughed and said that was incorrect, as America is a huge place with many countries in it, and that he was also an American, albeit from South America and Ecuador as one of the countries in that part of the South American continent. He also quite gently informed methat many other South Americans were sometimes bit resentful of folks from the USA referring only to themselves as “real” or “original” Americans as South Americans are as American as any other American. I was flabbergasted. And realized he was absolutely correct. And learned a great lesson.

    Anonymous

    November 13, 2009 at 8:19 pm

  94. What about a “Stranger in a Strange Land” theme? Put yourself in other
    people's shoes from a TCK perspective. Find a way to step outside your
    comfort zone and into someone else's, by trying new things, making a
    friend from a different culture, preparing food from a far-off place,
    etc. Learn how to reach out to others for help or guidance in an
    unfamiliar situation to foster human connection, which leads to
    understanding, which leads to compassion.

    Inga

    November 13, 2009 at 3:32 pm

  95. A Third Culture Kid knows that there is nothing to fear from variety and difference… or even that what is unusual is not so different after all. When you can look up and see only people, there is no longer any impetus to invent a story to justify your unjustified fears, to invent a story that justifies cruelty and attack. It's time we all realised this.

    Judy Crozier

    November 13, 2009 at 4:00 pm

  96. We should pick a different culture than our own and give yourself an assignment to interview, participate in an event and do first hand research in order to better understand a neighbor, here and abroad. Learn “hello” “goodbye” and “thank you” in that language and use at every opportunity to begin to recognize, start a conversation and see what response you get. It will change the way you are with “foreigners” and hopefully encourage curiousity of others unlike yourself.

    Anonymous

    November 13, 2009 at 10:21 pm

    • I’d like to add for the viral element: a video that contains the learned phrases in the new language with some representation of the 1st culture and the second or third. I learned those greetings/responses in Tibetan while I was in India for 6 months. I use them often here, back home in California and I always get a positive reaction and usually a conversation. Needless to say they are surprised that a black American knows a little about their culture and language.

      Anonymous

      November 13, 2009 at 10:38 pm

  97. “Compassion through collaboration: Finding humanity through achieving a common goal.”

    Compassion requires patience and understanding. An acceptance that the other doesn't necessarily feel, think, process exactly as we do, however we respect, love and tolerate them, try to understand them because we can rise above the petty differences and appreciate them for who they are and where they come from. Compassion does not equate with having or voicing an opinion nor does it require judgement and gossip.

    Compassion in the arts/performance arts. What do you think about collaborating with others to put on a cultural show, put on an international fair, cook an international dish? It takes a lot of compassion and understanding for people to work together for long periods of time to achieve a common goal, including an international performance. i.e. Bringing different kinds of artists to learn, teach, represent, show, perform, share their artform in the classroom, in the theater, in a gallery etc.?

    For example, I am grateful for how wonderfully welcoming my Middle Eastern and Balkan friends have been to me over the years… so in return I share my love of their culture with others by exposing their culture to others, sharing my love of their food, art, celebrations etc. Including teaching children different styles of dance from kathak, dabke, bellydance, breakdancing etc.

    facebook-699645252

    November 13, 2009 at 5:26 pm

  98. “Compassion through collaboration: Finding humanity through achieving a common goal.”

    Compassion requires patience and understanding. An acceptance that the other doesn't necessarily feel, think, process exactly as we do, however we respect, love and tolerate them, try to understand them because we can rise above the petty differences and appreciate them for who they are and where they come from. Compassion does not equate with having or voicing an opinion, but to listen without judgement.

    Compassion in the arts/performance arts. What do you think about collaborating with others to put on a cultural show, put on an international fair, cook an unfamiliar international dish? It takes a lot of compassion and understanding for people to work together for long periods of time to achieve a common goal, including an international performance. i.e. Bringing different kinds of artists to learn, teach, represent, show, perform, share their artform in the classroom, in the theater, in a gallery etc.?

    For example, I am grateful for how wonderfully welcoming my Middle Eastern and Balkan friends have been to me over the years… so in return I share my love of their culture with others by exposing their culture to others, sharing my love of their food, art, celebrations etc. Including teaching children different styles of dance from kathak, dabke, bellydance, breakdancing etc.

    -kittenita

    facebook-699645252

    November 13, 2009 at 5:40 pm

  99. What about a “Stranger in a Strange Land” theme? Put yourself in other
    people’s shoes from a TCK perspective. Find a way to step outside your
    comfort zone and into someone else’s, by trying new things, making a
    friend from a different culture, preparing food from a far-off place,
    etc. Learn how to reach out to others for help or guidance in an
    unfamiliar situation to foster human connection, which leads to
    understanding, which leads to compassion.

    Inga

    November 13, 2009 at 11:32 pm

  100. A Third Culture Kid knows that there is nothing to fear from variety and difference… or even that what is unusual is not so different after all. When you can look up and see only people, there is no longer any impetus to invent a story to justify your unjustified fears, to invent a story that justifies cruelty and attack. It’s time we all realised this.

    Judy Crozier

    November 14, 2009 at 12:00 am

  101. “Compassion through collaboration: Finding humanity through achieving a common goal.”

    Compassion requires patience and understanding. An acceptance that the other doesn’t necessarily feel, think, process exactly as we do, however we respect, love and tolerate them, try to understand them because we can rise above the petty differences and appreciate them for who they are and where they come from. Compassion does not necessarily equate with having or voicing a judgment or an opinion, but to listen without judgment.

    Compassion in the arts/performance arts. What about collaborating with others in your community to put on a cultural show, an international fair, to come together to cook unfamiliar international dishes, learn to perform a particular dance form? It takes a lot of compassion and understanding for people to work together for long periods of time to achieve a common goal, including bringing together an eclectic group to create an international performance. To cultivate learning in bringing together different kinds of artists to learn, teach, represent, show, perform, share their art form in the classroom, in the theater, in a gallery etc.

    As an example, I show my gratitude for how wonderfully welcoming my Middle Eastern and Balkan friends have been to me over the years… in sharing my love of their culture with others by exposing their culture to others: cooking their food, showing their arts and crafts, sharing their celebrations etc. Including teaching my kindergarten children different styles and forms of dance from kathak, bhangra, dabke, bellydance etc.

    -kittenita

    Anonymous

    November 14, 2009 at 1:26 am

  102. Anonymous

    November 14, 2009 at 1:40 am

  103. I think a photo slideshow, film, visual art display of showing compassion to others from different racial, cultural, ethnic, religious, and displaying it in a traveling gallery would be a great way. At the gallery openings, dance, music, theater performances showing compassion to others of different backgrounds could also take place from the local community of that city/town/village.

    Alaine

    November 13, 2009 at 9:02 pm

  104. Here's a quote. Something quick, simple, and straight to the point.

    “A cure to racism and prejudice?”

    Third Culture – It's more than diversity…

    Daniel Suh

    November 13, 2009 at 11:32 pm

  105. Learn: Bring a group of friends together and watch the movie “Lars and the Real Girl.”

    Share: Discuss the acts of compassion observed in the movie.

    Act: Commit to conduct one act of compassion within the next 7 days for someone “different” than oneself.

    Joy

    November 13, 2009 at 11:45 pm

  106. Here’s a quote. Something quick, simple, and straight to the point.

    “A cure to racism and prejudice?”

    Third Culture – It’s more than diversity…

    Daniel Suh

    November 14, 2009 at 7:32 am

  107. Learn: Bring a group of friends together and watch the movie “Lars and the Real Girl.”

    Share: Discuss the acts of compassion observed in the movie.

    Act: Commit to conduct one act of compassion within the next 7 days for someone “different” than oneself.

    Joy

    November 14, 2009 at 7:45 am

  108. 1. Select from all the contributions you get for this initiative the 365/366 most creative and diverse ideas, prepare with those a daily “E-idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion”
    2a. Set up a subscribers group specifically to receive “the idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion” as daily e-mail tip, and at the launch the Globalizing Compassion Campaign start sending each day a different E-idea.
    2b. If well organized, once the 365 ideas are selected and reformulated as needed, you could work through TCK circles to have each idea translated in the language of whichever country. This could give a very rich daily E-idea for the Globalizing Compassion Campaign.
    3. Work through the TCK network to try and get their old schools, and any other school all over the world to subscribe to the E-idea to Globalize Compassion Campaign, so one day a teacher or School Director may be inspired by a specific ideas and decide to actually do/organize it.
    4. Try to follow up with schools, asking them to provide pictures and stories of the events they organized, and a next year elaborate resources and news stories on those activities from different parts of the world (CNN can be involved again in this follow up, which may become really international).

    Besides using the contributions for the daily E-idea for the Globalizing Compassion Campaign, the idea of the day can feature on top of the homepages of TCK, TED.com’s Charter of Compassion, and who knows CNN or any other partnering entity that likes the idea of a globalizing compassion campaign.

    joininghands

    November 14, 2009 at 5:10 am

  109. I think, since everybody is snatching a day out of the 365 day year for a special purpose, it would only be right for us TCKs to have a special day when we remind the world of our own existence and the struggles that we have in attachment to it.
    Brice, just to mention it: I have a new e-mail address.: jaeschke.martin@yahoo.com

    martinjaeschke

    November 14, 2009 at 6:23 am

  110. 1. Select from all the contributions you get for this initiative the 365/366 most creative and diverse ideas, prepare with those a daily “E-idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion”
    2a. Set up a subscribers group specifically to receive “the idea of the day for Globalizing Compassion” as daily e-mail tip, and at the launch the Globalizing Compassion Campaign start sending each day a different E-idea.
    2b. If well organized, once the 365 ideas are selected and reformulated as needed, you could work through TCK circles to have each idea translated in the language of whichever country. This could give a very rich daily E-idea for the Globalizing Compassion Campaign.
    3. Work through the TCK network to try and get their old schools, and any other school all over the world to subscribe to the E-idea to Globalize Compassion Campaign, so one day a teacher or School Director may be inspired by a specific ideas and decide to actually do/organize it.
    4. Try to follow up with schools, asking them to provide pictures and stories of the events they organized, and a next year elaborate resources and news stories on those activities from different parts of the world (CNN can be involved again in this follow up, which may become really international).

    Besides using the contributions for the daily E-idea for the Globalizing Compassion Campaign, the idea of the day can feature on top of the homepages of TCK, TED.com’s Charter of Compassion, and who knows CNN or any other partnering entity that likes the idea of a globalizing compassion campaign.

    Anonymous

    November 14, 2009 at 1:10 pm

  111. I think, since everybody is snatching a day out of the 365 day year for a special purpose, it would only be right for us TCKs to have a special day when we remind the world of our own existence and the struggles that we have in attachment to it.
    Brice, just to mention it: I have a new e-mail address.: jaeschke.martin@yahoo.com

    Anonymous

    November 14, 2009 at 2:23 pm

    • Do you have a title for the day in mind? What types of activities would you propose?

      Anonymous

      November 14, 2009 at 7:49 pm

  112. Do you have a title for the day in mind? What types of activities would you propose?

    Docbethel

    November 14, 2009 at 11:49 am

  113. I was thinking that everyone could just send in a video of
    1. What is compassion
    2. How in some ways we have not been compassionate

    e.g ..Compassion to me is (inserts comments). And I have failed in being compassionate by (inserts comments)

    It is sort of a standardization of phrases. The only differences would be the individual comments that are used.

    I feel that by identifying what we lack, it would then show what we need to do. Its more of a self-realization activity. Powerful as a video I suppose.

    George Mong Teng - Ho

    November 15, 2009 at 9:43 am

  114. select TCKs from varies countries to film examples of compassion with their community. for example, different styles of greeting etc

    kirsty

    November 15, 2009 at 11:26 am

  115. I was thinking that everyone could just send in a video of
    1. What is compassion
    2. How in some ways we have not been compassionate

    e.g ..Compassion to me is (inserts comments). And I have failed in being compassionate by (inserts comments)

    It is sort of a standardization of phrases. The only differences would be the individual comments that are used.

    I feel that by identifying what we lack, it would then show what we need to do. Its more of a self-realization activity. Powerful as a video I suppose.

    George Mong Teng - Ho

    November 15, 2009 at 5:43 pm

  116. TCKids can become heros sharing their rich cross cultural background with the poor and underprivileged. Giving this strength will develop resilience, tolerance and a better world

    Erik

    November 15, 2009 at 1:54 pm

  117. select TCKs from varies countries to film examples of compassion with their community. for example, different styles of greeting etc

    kirsty

    November 15, 2009 at 7:26 pm

  118. TCKids can become heros sharing their rich cross cultural background with the poor and underprivileged. Giving this strength will develop resilience, tolerance and a better world

    Erik

    November 15, 2009 at 9:54 pm

  119. I love the idea of sharing the passion of third culture kids to do this.
    Why not get TCkids to work on Global Issues. The third culture kids, can already work together through the Global Issues Network. Maybe promote the use of these tools within schools to share ideas about the world and get them to actively be involved in all our futures.

    David Harrison

    November 15, 2009 at 7:40 pm

  120. I love the idea of sharing the passion of third culture kids to do this.
    Why not get TCkids to work on Global Issues. The third culture kids, can already work together through the Global Issues Network. Maybe promote the use of these tools within schools to share ideas about the world and get them to actively be involved in all our futures.

    David Harrison

    November 16, 2009 at 3:40 am

  121. Thanks everyone for your inputs, ideas and suggestions!! Keep them coming and remember to vote!

    Paulette

    Docbethel

    November 16, 2009 at 1:45 pm

  122. Thanks everyone for your inputs, ideas and suggestions!! Keep them coming and remember to vote!

    Paulette

    Anonymous

    November 16, 2009 at 9:45 pm

  123. I don't have a specific idea, but I wish there was some way to communicate to the children of TCK's about global awareness. I have been very open about my upbringing to my kids .. My son is the news editor of his high school newspaper and wrote about Typhoon Ondoy in the Philippines. He also wrote an essay for his college application about raising global awareness among high school kids. Reaching high school kids now requires an element of “cool factor” — perhaps YouTube, or a Gap or Benetton-style ad campaign. A video of the “poor orphans” overseas is just not going to cut it. I wish there was some way I could go to high schools and speak to the kids about how knowing about what is out there, other cultures, etc., will decrease intolerance and prejudice. If I can't make a TCK out of my own kids, I would like to at least let the kids of today know that being xenophobic only hurts ourselves.

    lizbranch

    November 17, 2009 at 12:40 pm

  124. Brice, I love some of the t-shirts that you have on your profile. I would so buy one … heck I would buy a bunch and sell them at my high school (Philippines) reunion next summer!

    lizbranch

    November 17, 2009 at 12:43 pm

  125. Let's let everyone know about this: http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-26490-Third-

    emyloulewis

    November 17, 2009 at 2:33 pm

  126. I don’t have a specific idea, but I wish there was some way to communicate to the children of TCK’s about global awareness. I have been very open about my upbringing to my kids .. My son is the news editor of his high school newspaper and wrote about Typhoon Ondoy in the Philippines. He also wrote an essay for his college application about raising global awareness among high school kids. Reaching high school kids now requires an element of “cool factor” — perhaps YouTube, or a Gap or Benetton-style ad campaign. A video of the “poor orphans” overseas is just not going to cut it. I wish there was some way I could go to high schools and speak to the kids about how knowing about what is out there, other cultures, etc., will decrease intolerance and prejudice. If I can’t make a TCK out of my own kids, I would like to at least let the kids of today know that being xenophobic only hurts ourselves.

    Anonymous

    November 17, 2009 at 8:40 pm

  127. Brice, I love some of the t-shirts that you have on your profile. I would so buy one … heck I would buy a bunch and sell them at my high school (Philippines) reunion next summer!

    lizbranch

    November 17, 2009 at 8:43 pm

    • Thanks for letting me know, if enough people want them I’ll hook all of you up. 🙂

      Anonymous

      November 27, 2009 at 8:01 pm

    • Well written article, Emily!

      Anonymous

      November 27, 2009 at 8:02 pm

  128. To globalize compassion, it is crucial to leverage the experiences of those who have grown up cross-culturally, learned two vastly different languages simultaneously, who find it ironic that they are more at home with those of a different skin color, and have greater empathy for the foreigner than the so-called ugly American, even if this person finds him or herself to be born a citizen of the US who is never quite at home in the US, and able to talk to President Obama in Indonesian if given the chance. Such a person is a Third Culture Kid, who has sythesized two different world cultures, languages, musical instruments, religions and customs into a compromising meeting ground or third culture. I actually grew up in multiple third cultures and required counseling as an adult after living in or visiting 35 countries so far–my Chinese fiddle (erhu) was stolen during a move and I still wear a sarong that's torn and now too small for me on some nights when I get “homesick” for Asia, and still make friends more easily with Asians than I do my own countrymen, especially when they hear me speak their own languages.

    leonardrobertson

    November 18, 2009 at 3:30 am

  129. To globalize compassion, it is crucial to leverage the experiences of those who have grown up cross-culturally, learned two vastly different languages simultaneously, who find it ironic that they are more at home with those of a different skin color, and have greater empathy for the foreigner than the so-called ugly American, even if this person finds him or herself to be born a citizen of the US who is never quite at home in the US, and able to talk to President Obama in Indonesian if given the chance. Such a person is a Third Culture Kid, who has sythesized two different world cultures, languages, musical instruments, religions and customs into a compromising meeting ground or third culture. I actually grew up in multiple third cultures and required counseling as an adult after living in or visiting 35 countries so far–my Chinese fiddle (erhu) was stolen during a move and I still wear a sarong that’s torn and now too small for me on some nights when I get “homesick” for Asia, and still make friends more easily with Asians than I do my own countrymen, especially when they hear me speak their own languages.

    Lenĉjo

    November 18, 2009 at 11:30 am

  130. Hooray. At last hopefully we will be recognized as the involuntary “subculture” we are.

    Michelle R Donnan

    November 19, 2009 at 6:44 pm

  131. Hooray. At last hopefully we will be recognized as the involuntary “subculture” we are.

    Michelle R Donnan

    November 20, 2009 at 2:44 am

  132. Learn about other Cultures Month – by getting to know (show interest in) people from other countries and learn about their CULTURAL differences.

    Human things must be known to be loved – Divine things must be loved in order to be known.

    Christilyn Biek Larson

    November 22, 2009 at 12:15 pm

  133. Learn about other Cultures Month – by getting to know (show interest in) people from other countries and learn about their CULTURAL differences.

    Human things must be known to be loved – Divine things must be loved in order to be known.

    Christilyn Biek Larson

    November 22, 2009 at 8:15 pm

  134. TCKID's share your compassion by “Torn Hearts” . Express when your heart was torn by someone by what they did or did not do, blog that story and see who has a similar experience and then work on it together to see the common theme and how to grow stronger. Others reading the blogs will see how their own actions can hurt others. This has no boundaries.

    Julia Simens

    November 26, 2009 at 1:45 am

  135. TCKID's share your compassion by “Torn Hearts” . Express when your heart was torn by someone by what they did or did not do, blog that story and see who has a similar experience and then work on it together to see the common theme and how to grow stronger. Others reading the blogs will see how their own actions can hurt others. This has no boundaries.

    juliasimens

    November 26, 2009 at 1:52 am

  136. TCKID’s share your compassion by “Torn Hearts” . Express when your heart was torn by someone by what they did or did not do, blog that story and see who has a similar experience and then work on it together to see the common theme and how to grow stronger. Others reading the blogs will see how their own actions can hurt others. This has no boundaries.

    Julia Simens

    November 26, 2009 at 9:45 am

  137. TCKID’s share your compassion by “Torn Hearts” . Express when your heart was torn by someone by what they did or did not do, blog that story and see who has a similar experience and then work on it together to see the common theme and how to grow stronger. Others reading the blogs will see how their own actions can hurt others. This has no boundaries.

    Anonymous

    November 26, 2009 at 9:52 am

  138. Thanks for letting me know, if enough people want them I'll hook all of you up. 🙂

    briceroyer

    November 27, 2009 at 12:01 pm

  139. Well written article, Emily!

    briceroyer

    November 27, 2009 at 12:02 pm

  140. A Day in Your Shoes

    Ask someone in your life, or a stranger if appropriate (or go to an agency or organization or nursing home or somewhere) if you can spend some time with them as they live with something difficult.

    Find out what it means to them to have a disability, or go shopping with small children on a budget, or be lonely and shy, or be hungry, or be a stranger in a new culture, or have so many expectations placed on them all day long.
    Listen and experience first, don't try to fix things, see what it is really like for them.

    Ask them what you or others could do to make their lives better. Find a way to respond practically.

    Be a voice for them (anonymously if they prefer) to others.

    Kathryn Cole

    November 27, 2009 at 12:42 pm

  141. A Day in Your Shoes

    Ask someone in your life, or a stranger if appropriate (or go to an agency or organization or nursing home or somewhere) if you can spend some time with them as they live with something difficult.

    Find out what it means to them to have a disability, or go shopping with small children on a budget, or be lonely and shy, or be hungry, or be a stranger in a new culture, or have so many expectations placed on them all day long.
    Listen and experience first, don’t try to fix things, see what it is really like for them.

    Ask them what you or others could do to make their lives better. Find a way to respond practically.

    Be a voice for them (anonymously if they prefer) to others.

    Kathryn Cole

    November 27, 2009 at 8:42 pm

  142. I really liked Kathryn's idea and would add a TCK twist…I think of TCKs as 'bridgers' – folks who can cross boundaries of culture, age, socio-economics, politics, etc because that is how we grew up. So, why not 'cross a bridge' or choose to find out about someone quite different from ourselves, to walk in someone's shoes, in a way that helps others to be compassionate, too?

    So, spend a day 'walking in someone else's shoes'- hanging out, shopping on a budget with small children etc. (See Kathryn's cool ideas) find out a practical way to help or encourage that person and then share that story with others across the bridge, or gap, so that others might follow with compassion and understanding (and help?) as well. Love this brainstorming!

    Michael Pollock

    November 28, 2009 at 5:04 am

  143. I really liked Kathryn’s idea and would add a TCK twist…I think of TCKs as ‘bridgers’ – folks who can cross boundaries of culture, age, socio-economics, politics, etc because that is how we grew up. So, why not ‘cross a bridge’ or choose to find out about someone quite different from ourselves, to walk in someone’s shoes, in a way that helps others to be compassionate, too?

    So, spend a day ‘walking in someone else’s shoes’- hanging out, shopping on a budget with small children etc. (See Kathryn’s cool ideas) find out a practical way to help or encourage that person and then share that story with others across the bridge, or gap, so that others might follow with compassion and understanding (and help?) as well. Love this brainstorming!

    Michael Pollock

    November 28, 2009 at 1:04 pm

    • Michael, that is exactly what I was thinking! TCKs are uniquely suited to step out of their context and into another’s, and then uniquely able to communicate that “other” in a way that can be better understood. I’m loving this brainstorming, too! I think it’s great that compassion is being talked about in tangible ways.

      Anonymous

      December 6, 2009 at 9:20 am

  144. […] This post was Twitted by erinsinogba […]

    Twitted by erinsinogba

    December 2, 2009 at 5:00 pm

  145. How about a “support a charity” week. Where people work towards raising money or doing voluntary work for a charity dealing with compassion in some way. With the current global market, charities are struggling to raise funds to do the work they do so well.

    Paul Trigg

    December 3, 2009 at 12:40 am

  146. How about a “support a charity” week. Where people work towards raising money or doing voluntary work for a charity dealing with compassion in some way. With the current global market, charities are struggling to raise funds to do the work they do so well.

    Paul Trigg

    December 3, 2009 at 8:40 am

  147. Michael, that is exactly what I was thinking! TCKs are uniquely suited to step out of their context and into another's, and then uniquely able to communicate that “other” in a way that can be better understood. I'm loving this brainstorming, too! I think it's great that compassion is being talked about in tangible ways.

    kathryncole

    December 6, 2009 at 1:20 am

  148. I received new revised edition of Third Culture kids book yesterday by mail. I have not started reading the book yet and I have just skimmed the book. But the book seems better than ever. Our friend, Brice and TCKID is mentioned in the book. I would encourage everyone to buy the book.

    Takako

    December 8, 2009 at 1:02 pm

  149. I received new revised edition of Third Culture kids book yesterday by mail. I have not started reading the book yet and I have just skimmed the book. But the book seems better than ever. Our friend, Brice and TCKID is mentioned in the book. I would encourage everyone to buy the book.

    Takako

    December 8, 2009 at 9:02 pm

  150. i like the day of greatness (not awesomeness) and a day in someone else's shoes. the problem with the golden rule is that not everyone wants to be treated the way we want to be greated, some people want to be treated in a different way, it is important to ask and not to asume!!!

    nathalia berkowitz

    January 7, 2010 at 3:15 pm

  151. i like the day of greatness (not awesomeness) and a day in someone else’s shoes. the problem with the golden rule is that not everyone wants to be treated the way we want to be greated, some people want to be treated in a different way, it is important to ask and not to asume!!!

    nathalia berkowitz

    January 7, 2010 at 11:15 pm

  152. […] part of our partnership with TED.com’s Charter for Compassion, we put together a video of fellow TCKs talking about compassion in different […]


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