News TCKID

News from the TCKid Community

(Book revision) Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds.

with 31 comments

by Ruth E. Van Reken

Greetings to all,

Just to let you know that the Third Culture Kid book revision is now available. Please note a tiny title change too, just so you can make sure to find it. It used to be Third Culture Kids: The Experiences of Growing Up Among Worlds. Now it is simply “Third Culture Kids: Growing UP Among Worlds, revised edition.” (no “the experience of”..)

You can order the book here on Amazon.

third culture kids book revised

So what’s the same? What is different or new in the new edition?

What’s the same is the original book is still there…the explanatory chapters at the beginning, the TCK Profile, the “how to help” chapters at the end. Hopefully they are only better and strengthened with lessons learned in the last ten years.

What’s new? Besides updating various facts and figures, acknowledging the arrival of Facebook, Skype, and other changes in our world since the first edition, we have added a chapter on Cross-cultural kids–a larger overarching category to which we belong with others who also grow up cross-culturally. Hopefully this enlargement will give us new ways to look at how lessons learned in our experience also relate to many others…and also to acknowledge the growing complexity of many TCKs stories… We feature Brice’s story as one of our examples!

Each chapter after the first 3 ends with “Lessons from the TCK Petri Dish”…the place where we examine new ways to use and apply our story to other CCKs in today’s world.

And then, the last appendix, Appendix B, is an article by Momo Kano Podolsky, writing about her research into the Japanese experience of TCKs. I hope this will begin to bring to light a huge amount of research most of us don’t know about because most is written in Japanese. But it’s great to begin seeing work done in many lands and places begin to come together.

So just want you know the revision is out and what the updates are, even without messing up the parts that I hope had helped at least some of you find language for your own story.

May you find new joy in your journey each day…

Ruth E. Van Reken
http://crossculturalkid.org

Questions? Comments? Please leave a comment below this blog.

UPDATE: October 16thThank you ALL for your responses..I’m trying to write each of you back but never sure how all of this works (Brice knows I’m internet challenged!) But what gratifies me most is how quickly you are enthusiastic for the expanding ways to see and use our many facteted stories in the larger context of how the world is becoming..and I do want to say one word to Michael. One great hope I have in doing this update is to honor the vision my co-author, Dave Pollock, already had for other types of CCKs in the first edition..we just didn’t have the language yet…but as you more than well know since you have known him longer than any of us…his work with refugees and non-Western TCKs for many years before his death as well as traditional TCKs was the seed bed for so many ideas here. My last letter to him was saying it was time to update the book as we had talked about before, but I never received a reply before his untimely death. I want to publicly honor your father here as the one who gave me my “Aha” moment more than twenty five years ago and has led the way for so many of us personally and with what is on this website now. He was a great, great man and it will always have been my honor to know him and work with him on the original TCK project and hopefully carry his vision on a bit more in this edition.

Written by Ruth Van Reken

October 12, 2009 at 11:56 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

  • Michael

    Thanks Ruth, I was going to buy another copy of the book so I’ll make sure I get the new one!

  • Jenni

    Thanks Ruth! I was just telling a Russian TCK I met about your book.

  • Cynthia

    Ruth ~ I am so thankful for your book and as you mentioned, giving me language to my situation. Just knowing how to express my experience was a huge step in reconciling some of the loss and loneliness that came with the excitement of my TCK experience. I passed the book around to all of my silbings (5 of them) and all agreed that it was spot on. Congratulations on the update!

  • Wanda Koppensteiner

    Thanks for the new one! Seems like you don’t get sick and tired of the TCKid topic either! Congratulations! and….When will the next book be ready? This issue is never ending and extremely important! Please never stop with it!

  • http://www.examiner.com/x-26490-Third-Culture-Kids-Examiner Emylou

    Thanks! Going to get it!

  • Cookie Fischer

    Thank you Ruth again for giving us a voice and a sense of balance in our lives. I have been using the TCK book for many years now as a resource in my transcultural competence classes for university students and in my coaching and training sessions. It has opened a new path of self- awareness and self-acceptance for students and executives (and their families), as well as anyone who has a bicultural, immigrant or multicultural background.

    On the other hand there are students who have neither traveled nor “fit the TCK definition”, who immediately identify the TCK characteristics with their own life skills and start understanding how they have tackled their personal life situations. For example a student in the Netherlands (from a divorced household) spent her childhood alternating living one week in the home of her remarried mother and the following in the home of her remarried father until she became a teenager (when it changed to two weeks at a time still alternating). It was similar to living in different countries!!! (father culture and mother culture!!!). She completely identified with the characteristics and skills and in fact has become an incredible cross-cultural coach, she is flexible, adaptable, empathetic and a good listener with the ability to find links in issues at a meta level. And many more life skills similar to those of a TCK.

    With the new paradigm shift towards a more systemic approach, I know your work will continue to help people worldwide. Thank you for continuing your very important efforts in helping us discover who we are and finding our inner strengths.

    I am looking forward to reading the revised edition and continuing the personal growth process.

    with warm regards,
    Cookie Fischer

  • Tobia Veith

    Thanks so much, Ruth. As a an Adult TCK and mom of three amazing TCKs in their teens this update is very welcome. I will be ordering one and gifting some to others.

  • Pingback: TCK Book Update « Cross Culture Youth

  • http://MichaelPollock Michael Pollock

    Hey Ruth,

    Thanks for the update! I had just seen it on Intercultural Press Website and am very excited about the updates and emphasis. Thanks for bringing your CCK work to the edition too. Maybe next version I can jump in on the educational chapter. :)Next week I will do a training for International School Chinese staff on TCK identity and how to enhance working with thier TCKs…

    Intercultural press says there are now versions in Norwegian, German, Korean and Japanese…and that the book is currently at a Frankfurt book fair being offered for translation rights. I hope Mandarin comes soon!

    Blessings,
    Michael
    PS I think Dave would be really pleased, too.

  • http://www.itinerances.ch Deniz Gyger

    Dear Ruth, Thanks for this new edition:-)
    I am very impatient to discover the new chapter about CcK as well as the part drafted by Momo Kano Podolsky. I think it’s important to take as much experiences into account from different TcK/CcK in order to better understand the challenges they have to face.
    Is a French translation of the work planned ? I would love that 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Meilleures salutations,

    Deniz

  • http://www.crossculturalkid.org Ruth

    Thank you ALL for your responses..I’m trying to write each of you back but never sure how all of this works (Brice knows I’m internet challenged!) But what gratifies me most is how quickly you are enthusiastic for the expanding ways to see and use our many facteted stories in the larger context of how the world is becoming..and I do want to say one word to Michael. One great hope I have in doing this update is to honor the vision my co-author, Dave Pollock, already had for other types of CCKs in the first edition..we just didn’t have the language yet…but as you more than well know since you have known him longer than any of us…his work with refugees and non-Western TCKs for many years before his death as well as traditional TCKs was the seed bed for so many ideas here. My last letter to him was saying it was time to update the book as we had talked about before, but I never received a reply before his untimely death. I want to publicly honor your father here as the one who gave me my “Aha” moment more than twenty five years ago and has led the way for so many of us personally and with what is on this website now. He was a great, great man and it will always have been my honor to know him and work with him on the original TCK project and hopefully carry his vision on a bit more in this edition.

  • http://expatriatelife.wordpress.com/ Judy

    I first discovered the term TCK about 10 years ago when researching the long impact our expat lives might have on our then teenage son. In a lightbulb moment I realized that I was also married to an adult TCK! So much about our lives together suddenly became clear, including perhaps the real reason we emigrated in our 20’s and our later foray into the expatriate world. I’m so glad you’ve re-issued this book and I’m now off to Aamazon to buy it.

  • Brenda

    Ruth, I am very excited to read the new version. I must have enlightened well over 100 TCK/MCK’s about your book. I am a TCK myself with 2 kids that are as MCK/CCK’s. It will be nice to share the new version with them. I am working in the educational field with many Hispanics… any Spanish translations in the works?

    Thank you for your continued passion.

  • Ella

    I’m very excited to get my hands on it!!!!

  • jannabecker

    Hi Ruth,
    I haven't had the chance to look at the revised version yet, but I wanted to share a phenomenon that I only recently started thinking about. I'm the eldest of 4 TCK's, only my youngest sister who is 7 years younger than me, and was 9 when we returned from overseas, doesn't seem to feel the same way as my two brothers and I.
    She's always seemed a little different to the rest of us – even just in her personality, but my husband (a mono-cultural kid!), wondered recently whether she falls into a category of her own – an Aussie kid who's grown up in a family of Missionary Parents and TCK kids, which has therefore shaped the family dynamics.
    The closest name I've got for this is that she's a 2nd Generation TCK or a TCK-By-Association.
    I'm wondering if this is a situation you've come across before, and what your thoughts are.

    Thanks! (And thank you so much for writing your book with David Pollock – it validated my experience for the first time and has been an absolute lifeline for my husband and I as we try to navigate what is effectively a cross cultural marriage!).

    Much Love,
    Janna

  • Anonymous

    Hi Ruth,
    I haven’t had the chance to look at the revised version yet, but I wanted to share a phenomenon that I only recently started thinking about. I’m the eldest of 4 TCK’s, only my youngest sister who is 7 years younger than me, and was 9 when we returned from overseas, doesn’t seem to feel the same way as my two brothers and I.
    She’s always seemed a little different to the rest of us – even just in her personality, but my husband (a mono-cultural kid!), wondered recently whether she falls into a category of her own – an Aussie kid who’s grown up in a family of Missionary Parents and TCK kids, which has therefore shaped the family dynamics.
    The closest name I’ve got for this is that she’s a 2nd Generation TCK or a TCK-By-Association.
    I’m wondering if this is a situation you’ve come across before, and what your thoughts are.

    Thanks! (And thank you so much for writing your book with David Pollock – it validated my experience for the first time and has been an absolute lifeline for my husband and I as we try to navigate what is effectively a cross cultural marriage!).

    Much Love,
    Janna

  • kandi707

    I just finished reading the older version – purchased it even though I knew a new one was coming out. I'm 58 and just this past June heard the term third Culture Kid for the first time in my life. It explains so much of how I have felt over the years and some of the decisions that I made. How I wish my mother was still alive so we could have discussed it with her.

  • kandi707

    While I knew a new version was coming out I purchased the prior one not too long ago as I really needed (yes needed) to read it. It was only in June 2009 that I first heard the TCK term. I'm 58 now and it was when I was 10 that I lived overseas! Your book explained so much about my thoughts and feelings and about many of the decisions I have made in the past. How I wish my mother was still alive so we could hash it out together. Thank you!

  • Anonymous

    I just finished reading the older version – purchased it even though I knew a new one was coming out. I’m 58 and just this past June heard the term third Culture Kid for the first time in my life. It explains so much of how I have felt over the years and some of the decisions that I made. How I wish my mother was still alive so we could have discussed it with her.

  • Anonymous

    While I knew a new version was coming out I purchased the prior one not too long ago as I really needed (yes needed) to read it. It was only in June 2009 that I first heard the TCK term. I’m 58 now and it was when I was 10 that I lived overseas! Your book explained so much about my thoughts and feelings and about many of the decisions I have made in the past. How I wish my mother was still alive so we could hash it out together. Thank you!

    • Barbara

      I liked your letter and thoroughly identify with your experience.I am 66 now and learned about TCK about eight years ago when I was invited to attend the “Reunion of Strangers” at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago. I recall many of cried the whole weekend! What a relief to discover that you are not insane, as people would say, strange, weird or anything else like. There are “lots of others like me!”
      I was fortunate to be able to share the book with my mother before she died. Two comments from her: first she said she felt that I was punishing her by asking her to read the book. She got quite defensive. As she continued to read more and think more about it she said that a lot of t he book applied to her also. Every time she moved between the “home” country and the place of service (China and India) she had many of the same experiences. She felt like a fish out of water and very lonely etc.

      • Anonymous

        Thank you Barbara for your kind word. I remember a conversation I did have with my mother when I was in my early 40’s I think. We were talking about some of the problems I had when we returned “home” and I explained part of what I had gone through, finally able to put it into words. What amazes me now is that I was actually describing much of what I have recently been reading on the subject. I or we just didn’t relize there was actually a name for it. And yes it does help so very much to know that I am not alone!

  • Pingback: (Winners announced!) Third Culture Kids Charter of Compassion

  • Barbara

    I liked your letter and thoroughly identify with your experience.I am 66 now and learned about TCK about eight years ago when I was invited to attend the “Reunion of Strangers” at the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago. I recall many of cried the whole weekend! What a relief to discover that you are not insane, as people would say, strange, weird or anything else like. There are “lots of others like me!”
    I was fortunate to be able to share the book with my mother before she died. Two comments from her: first she said she felt that I was punishing her by asking her to read the book. She got quite defensive. As she continued to read more and think more about it she said that a lot of t he book applied to her also. Every time she moved between the “home” country and the place of service (China and India) she had many of the same experiences. She felt like a fish out of water and very lonely etc.

  • kandi707

    Thank you Barbara for your kind word. I remember a conversation I did have with my mother when I was in my early 40's I think. We were talking about some of the problems I had when we returned “home” and I explained part of what I had gone through, finally able to put it into words. What amazes me now is that I was actually describing much of what I have recently been reading on the subject. I or we just didn't relize there was actually a name for it. And yes it does help so very much to know that I am not alone!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Joy-Foursquare/1331562581 Joy Foursquare

    We lead the Missions department for our denomination (church) in a national level, and I always recommend and give as a gift this books to the ones that are leaving or coming back to the US.
    Wonderful material and i had the privilege to attend two workshop's that David had done overseas!!! What a privilege and i found myself as I am also a Third Culture Kid (which i did not know till then)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Joy-Foursquare/1331562581 Joy Foursquare

    We lead the Missions department for our denomination (church) in a national level, and I always recommend and give as a gift this books to the ones that are leaving or coming back to the US.
    Wonderful material and i had the privilege to attend two workshop’s that David had done overseas!!! What a privilege and i found myself as I am also a Third Culture Kid (which i did not know till then)

  • Attachiante

    Hello Ruth,

    Here are some things I like less about your book.

    1) Kids? Why are those of us who have had these experiences forever kids? In addition to the choice of terminology is also a choice of focus. and the focus is on children, on taking care of children, on helping teachers and parents to better help and understand children, which leads on to my next point:

    2) Pathologising. The starting-point is that there is a problem, there are people who need help. Great for attracting the type of people who 'need to feel needed' & helping to the field, but not the most helpful epistemological or ontological starting point, in terms of setting out to actually understand a phenomenom? And does it not just reinforce teh tendency to see monocultural provincialism as the norm, and mobility and cross-cultural interaction as deviant?

    3) It seems you are primarily talking about missionary kids, and Anglo-American ones at that. A little misleading and a bit of elision then not to be more honest about that?

  • Attachiante

    In fact what I propose is an equivalent book : “Mono-Cultural Kids: On growing up in one place”.

  • Attachiante

    Hello Ruth,

    Here are some things I like less about your book.

    1) Kids? Why are those of us who have had these experiences forever kids? In addition to the choice of terminology is also a choice of focus. and the focus is on children, on taking care of children, on helping teachers and parents to better help and understand children, which leads on to my next point:

    2) Pathologising. The starting-point is that there is a problem, there are people who need help. Great for attracting the type of people who ‘need to feel needed’ & helping to the field, but not the most helpful epistemological or ontological starting point, in terms of setting out to actually understand a phenomenom? And does it not just reinforce teh tendency to see monocultural provincialism as the norm, and mobility and cross-cultural interaction as deviant?

    3) It seems you are primarily talking about missionary kids, and Anglo-American ones at that. A little misleading and a bit of elision then not to be more honest about that?

  • Attachiante

    In fact what I propose is an equivalent book : “Mono-Cultural Kids: On growing up in one place”.